£6 million to probe impact of hazardous chemicals

The Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) has awarded £6 million to investigate the effects that potentially hazardous chemicals used by humans are having on UK habitats and wildlife.

A workshop co-hosted by NERC, including representatives from government, regulation and industry, concluded that vital research needs to be done to understand the impact that new chemicals and combinations of chemicals are having on our ecosystems, and the animals and plants that depend on them.

With new chemicals constantly being used in agriculture, industry and everyday life, this research not only hopes to uncover unforeseen effects, but also to devise a new way for testing these impacts that can be applied to all types of ecosystems found in freshwater, at sea and on land.

The current standard method of testing determines how toxic individual chemicals are but is unable to look at the combined effects of a mixture of chemicals, which can be quite a different picture.

NERC Associate Director of Research, Ned Garnett, said: “Healthy and productive terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems are vital to the economy and wellbeing of the UK. They play a key role in areas such as food production, providing clean water, absorbing carbon from the atmosphere and supporting sustainable fish stocks, as well as supporting our wildlife. This research will provide new evidence on how chemicals used in farming, industry and everyday life are impacting on these environments.”

The grants were awarded to teams led by Professor Andrew Johnson and Dr David Spurgeon, both of the NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH), and Professor Guy Woodward at Imperial College London.

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About The Author

John Swire - Deputy editor of Agronomist and Arable Farmer as well as responsibility for the Agronomist and Arable Farmer and Farm Business websites. After 17 years milking cows on the family farm John started writing about agriculture in 1998 and has since written for a variety of publications and has developed a wide circle of contacts within the industry. When not working John is a season ticket holder at Stoke City and also of late has become a fitness freak, listing cycling, swimming and walking as his exercises of choice.