Greater seeding flexibility from the Lemken Solitair with divided seed hopper

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Just under a year after the successful market launch of the Solitair 9+ pneumatic seed drill, Lemken now introduces its new “Duo” version with divided seed hopper. This machine offers a wide range of options for simultaneously spreading seeds, fertiliser and even catch crops. With it, Lemken, the specialist for professional arable farming, has expanded its portfolio to include a machine for consistently cost-optimised market fruit cultivation.

The seed hopper of the Solitair 9+ Duo holds 1,850 litres. Its capacity can be split 50/50 or 60/40, depending on needs. As a result, two application variants are possible:

In the single-shot version, seeds and fertiliser are combined downstream from the two metering units in each of the two hopper segments. The different components are guided to the double disc coulters via a seed pipe and deposited in a seed furrow. This allows a suitable starting dose of fertiliser to be added for winter sowing or a complete fertiliser application for summer sowing. An automatic tramline mechanism is integrated into the distributors.

The double-shot system provides greater deposition flexibility. With this system, the two components flow separately to a double disc coulter via doubled distributors in two seed pipes. They can then be spread either in a single row, as with the single-shot method, or separately and alternately in two rows following a quick exchange of the tramline cartridge in the distributor. In addition, the deposition depth of every other row can be adjusted separately via the pressure roller up to a difference of 5 cm. This allows two different seeds to be placed at different, optimum seeding depths or inter-row fertilisation to be applied while seeding.

The Solitair 9+ Duo is available in working widths of three and four metres. Orders are being accepted now; full availability is scheduled for January 2022.

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About Author

Editor of Agronomist and Arable Farmer as well as responsibility for the Agronomist and Arable Farmer and Farm Business websites. After 17 years milking cows on the family farm John started writing about agriculture in 1998 and has since written for a variety of publications and has developed a wide circle of contacts within the industry. When not working John is an avid follower of Stoke City.